AMERICAN BUSINESS AND DISCUSSION BOARD

game had the NHL

 by Cl11234566 , Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:55 am

(SportsNetwork.com) - The Toronto Blue Jays will try to bounce back from a series loss on Monday evening as they play host to the struggling Boston Red Sox in the first of three straight meetings. The Blue Jays began their nine-game residency by losing two of three to the Tampa Bay Rays, losing Sundays rubber match 2-1 in 10 innings. That defeat leaves Toronto 5 1/2 games back of the second wild card spot in the American League. J.A. Happ starts tonight for the Blue Jays hoping to end a three-start losing streak. He lasted only 3 1/3 innings on Tuesday at Milwaukee, charged with four runs on six hits and two walks. "We got outplayed and it started with me," said the left-hander, who is now 8-8 with a 4.39 earned run average on the season. Happ has gone 3-2 with a 4.36 ERA over his career against Boston and picked up his most recent victory against the club on July 22. The 31-year-old logged six scoreless innings, working around seven hits. Happ is set to go against a Boston club that has lost eight in a row and finished up a 2-9 homestand with an 8-6 loss to Seattle on Sunday. "The thing that we continue to stress is the unanswered runs," said Red Sox manager John Farrell. "When we score, the ability to then put up a zero is key. For us to snap out of where we are, its going to come from more consistency on the mound." It was a tough series at the plate for the Red Sox, who placed shortstop Xander Bogaerts on the seven-day concussion disabled list after Sundays game. Bogaerts was hit in the head by a changeup from Mariners starter Felix Hernandez on Friday. David Ortiz, meanwhile, was hit by a pitch on Saturday, but was in the lineup the following day before fouling a ball off his right foot. He left after the sixth inning and is day-to-day. Boston kicks off a 10-game road trip tonight with Clay Buchholz on the hill. Buchholz has not won since July 18, going 0-3 with a 7.05 ERA in six starts since. He is coming off Wednesdays setback to the Los Angeles Angels as he yielded six runs over six innings. "I felt good for just about every pitch," said Buchholz. "I just missed location with a couple of pitches and they were able to put a big inning together." The 30-year-old righty is 5-8 with a 5.94 ERA on the year and his current winless streak includes back-to-back losses to Toronto on July 23 and 28. Buchholz allowed a total of 11 earned runs, 13 hits and eight walks over 11 innings as he is now 10-8 lifetime versus the Blue Jays with a 3.22 ERA. The Blue Jays are 10-3 versus the Red Sox this year, winning each of the past six meetings. Merv Rettenmund Jersey . - A pitch clock will be used this season during minor league games at Triple-A and Double-A, but it has been ruled out for the major leagues this year. Tanner Scott Jersey . Former San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds made his longshot request of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco. A three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit upheld Bonds conviction in September. https://www.cheaporioles.com/1958i-tippy...ey-orioles.html. Sterling was banned for life and fined US$2.5 million by the NBA on Tuesday for racist comments the league says he made in a recorded conversation. Nash, who plays for the rival L.A. Lakers, spoke as a representative of current NBA players at a press conference assembled by Sacramento mayor and National Basketball Players Association adviser Kevin Johnson. Paul Blair Jersey . The right-hander pitched into the seventh inning and boosted Cincinnatis struggling offence by hitting a double and scoring as the Reds ended a seven-game losing streak by beating the Atlanta Braves 1-0 Saturday night. Mark Belanger Jersey . But qualifying for her first Scotties Tournament of Hearts after years of falling short in tough Manitoba provincial championships is as good as consolation prizes get for the 29-year-old from Winnipegs Fort Rouge Curling Club.MINNEAPOLIS -- Another group of former NHL players has joined the fight for compensation for head injuries they say they incurred while playing, while at the same time targeting the violence of the game that they believe brought about those injuries. Retired players Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett filed a class action lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday alleging that the league has promoted fighting and downplayed the risk of head injuries that come from it. "I think the glorified violence is really the Achilles heel for the NHL," said Charles "Bucky" Zimmerman, an attorney at Zimmerman Reed that filed the lawsuit on behalf of the players. "If anything comes of this, the focus on the glorified violence and perhaps the change to that will be a good thing." The lawsuit, which is similar to one brought by former football players against the NFL, joins others filed by hockey players in Washington and New York and seeks monetary damages and increased medical monitoring. The NHLPA declined to comment. A message was left with the NHL seeking comment. Zimmerman also worked on the football litigation, which resulted in the NFL agreeing to pay a $765 million settlement to thousands of former players. That settlement is still awaiting a judges approval, but the headlines it generated have been partially responsible for hockey players mounting their own case against the NHL. "Weve seen it in football. Its now here in hockey. Its of the same genesis," Zimmerman said. "Theres knowledge, we believe, that these type of concussive injuries were known and protections were not put in place appropriately enough and fast enough and rules changes were not implemented even today in fighting. "Players continue to be at risk aand suffer as a result of those risks that they take on behalf of the sport.dddddddddddd We think those are unreasonable and they should be changed and the players should be compensated." The lawsuit alleges "the NHL hid or minimized concussion risks from its players, thereby putting them at a substantially higher risk for developing memory loss, depression, cognitive difficulties, and even brain related diseases such as dementia, Alzheimers disease, and Parkinsons disease." One argument that tries to separate the NFL litigation from the NHL case is that by engaging in fighting, players willfully take on the health risks that could come from that. "You could make that argument only to a point," Zimmerman said. "And the point is that the fighting arena would not exist and would be outlawed as it is in every other level of the game had the NHL not condoned it and sold tickets based upon it and promoted the sport in that way. Its not the players that promote the sport in that way because the players dont implement the rules. Its the league that implements the rules. If they would outlaw fighting, there wouldnt be people who would fight." Zimmerman said he thinks more players will join the litigation much in the same way the group of plaintiffs in the NFL case exponentially grew as it progressed. "The light went on for them as the football players story was becoming more told," Zimmerman said. "I think the hockey players started to see that their story was going to be heard and told. Its not that we havent known about football players or hockey players getting hurt. Its now become more important that we talk about it and do something about it rather than just benignly let it continue into the future." ' ' '

Cl11234566
Posts: 360
Date registered 10.23.2019

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game had the NHL Cl11234566 11.28.2019
 

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